Keys to successful video advertising on mobile devices

Plenty of video content is still viewed online, but the main difference now is that more users watch internet videos from smartphones, tablets and connected television instead of just from desktops and laptops. As a result, brands should frame their internet video advertising campaigns in terms of different screens instead of different websites.

Posted on Oct 16, 2012 by YuMe

The increasing proliferation of mobile devices – a Nielsen report from July found that more than 55 percent of all U.S. mobile subscribers now have a smartphone – is forcing video advertisers to rethink former branding strategies. However, just because technology is changing how consumers are consuming content does not mean that brands can't find beneficial opportunities, said Shiva Rajaraman, YouTube’s director of product management, according to GigaOM.

Plenty of video content is still viewed online, but the main difference now is that more users watch internet videos from smartphones, tablets and connected television instead of just from desktops and laptops. As a result, Rajaraman said brands should frame their internet video advertising campaigns in terms of different screens instead of different websites. Online video ads should be housed on one site that is optimized for ideal viewing from a variety of screens, instead of being designed to play on multiple websites. In this way, consumers can view internet video ads similarly to television spots, with the same advertisement appearing on multiple channels.

Best practices for video advertising online
Luckily, Rajaraman said that video ads are better suited for smartphones and tablets than display ads, which can appear too small on some screens. The best bet is to go with pre-roll video ads to make sure the message of a spot reaches its biggest possible audience. A YuMe report from August found that pre-roll spots watched between April to June of this year were viewed to completion 69 percent of the time.

While the YuMe report also showed that 15-second and 30-second spots were the most popular lengths for video ads and those advertisements were the most likely to be viewed to completion, Rajaraman said that brands may want to consider expanding their repertoire of ads by occasionally opting for longer videos. For example, a call to action in a 60-second video may be better at spurring business than showing four 15-second spots to the same person.

"[A]dvertisers trying to induce a call to action (like asking a viewer to go to a web page) can try to reach the target with one big splash rather than using conventional TVs tactic of bombarding the target with the same ad," Jeff John Roberts wrote in a September 20 GigaOM article.

The key, according to Rajaraman, is to think about how consumers interact with different devices. He said that televisions are ideal for display, whereas mobile technology is better suited for consumer discovery.