To reach distracted consumers, use multi-screen advertising

Brands hoping to have the widest reach for their online video ads may want to pair them with spots appearing on multiple formats, as viewers are more likely to notice and remember a campaign if it appears on more than one screen.

Posted on Dec 11, 2012 by YuMe

Brands hoping to have the widest reach for their online video ads may want to pair them with spots appearing on multiple formats, as some of the latest research from YuMe shows that viewers are more likely to notice and remember a campaign if it appears on more than one screen.

Video advertisers in the past had only one screen to target: the television. However, the rise of computers and mobile devices has boosted video viewing options for people. Yet, while the TV is no longer the sole video option for consumers, no single alternative has replaced television as the clear top choice for media consumption. According to YuMe, while 49 percent of all media consumption still comes from a television, 16 percent is from the internet and 12 percent of that time goes toward playing video games. In addition, the report found that the average American owns close to four devices, and total figures show that there are more than 37 million tablets, more than 86 million PCs and close to 287 million TV sets owned in the United States.

So while the television is still the dominant media consumption option for many Americans, the proliferation of internet-enabled devices has cut into TV's lead. As a result, consumers see video ads more than ever, which can make one spot appearing on only a TV or a computer less effective. YuMe's report found that TV ads were only recalled about 27 percent of the time. In comparison internet video ads were remembered 43 percent of the time and mobile video ads had a 35 percent recall rate.

"Our annual industry-leading research into ad effectiveness helps brands and agencies make better sense of the rapidly evolving media opportunities they encounter," Ed Haslam, YuMe's senior vice president of marketing, said in a September release. "Consumer attention is fragmented across screens amid a dizzying array of content, and viewing habits differ by time of day. This year’s study takes these factors into account and finds that clutter-free ad environments give advertisers the greatest ROI, regardless of screen size. What’s more, connected TV-essentially TV ‘without the clutter’-yields strong viewer attentiveness, emotion and recall, and represents a prime opportunity for ad breakthrough."

For higher recall rates, consider multi-screen advertising
While the proliferation of smartphones, tablets and PCs may seem like it would hurt brands, it can present a golden opportunity. The key, according to YuMe's report, is to think outside of traditional siloed efforts and instead consider a multi-screen approach. An increasing number of people multi-task while watching television, and video advertisers should consider adopting a similar mindset.

For example, FierceCable reported that 40 percent of tablet owners use their mobile device while watching television. YuMe said this helps to partially explain why TV ads have the lowest recall rates, as viewers are not devoting all of their attention to one screen over another one. However, if the same video ad appeared on both the tablet and the television, its likely recall rate will increase.

However, according to FierceCable, a multi-screen campaign needs to take into account the habits of users based on a device's screen type. For example, while television is a larger "laid back" screen, a tablet is a more personal device. As such, while a more general video ad appearing on TV can reach a wide audience, the more personalized use of mobile devices means that successful mobile video ads need to be better tailored to the end user's needs.

"To ensure accurate and consistent personalized video recommendations on all of a consumer’s devices, a solution must follow the consumer from device to device, tracking and managing the consumer’s behavior on his or her set-top box, tablet, mobile device, etc.," the news source said. "Additionally, the solution should identify unique viewing behavior on a mobile device vs. a set-top box and deliver recommendations accordingly."